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Songwiters Can't Sue Without Copyright Certificate says U.S. Supreme Court, RIAA Cries Foul  

Songwiters Can't Sue Without Copyright Certificate says U.S. Supreme Court, RIAA Cries Foul 

In a rare unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that applying for a copyright is not enough to sue someone for copyright infringement.  It currently can take months to receive the formal certificate of registration. 

In the case between Fourth Estate Public Benefit Corporation and Wall-Street.com, the Court decided that copyright holders must wait for a registration certificate before filing a lawsuit. 

“This ruling allows administrative backlog to prejudice the timely enforcement of constitutionally based rights and prevents necessary and immediate action against infringement that happens at Internet speed,” the RIAA said in a statement. “Given this ruling, the Copyright Office must also work at Internet speed to ensure adequate enforcement protects essential rights.” 

The Copyright Alliance agreed: “(On) average, it takes the Copyright Office six months to process a claim. That average goes up to nine months if a Copyright Office Examiner needs to correspond with a copyright owner. In a world of viral, online infringement, a lot of damage can be done to a copyrighted work while an owner is powerless to stop it.” 

Too Bad, says The Supremes 

“Delays, in large part, are the result of Copyright Office staffing and budgetary shortages that Congress can alleviate, but courts cannot cure. Unfortunate as the current administrative lag may be, that factor does not allow this Court to revise §411(a)’s congressionally composed text,” write Justice Ginsburg in the ruling. 

Read the full decision via Torrentfreak here.

Finding Your Passion  

If you struggle with the question, "What are you passionate about?" you're in much better (and much bigger) company than you probably realize. 

When I was younger, I thought I was passionate about a lot of things – music, movies, faith, girls, Star Trek... 

But in reality what I was truly passionate about was just feelingpassionate. Once the flame died, on to the next fire I'd move. 

It's tempting to rely on Hollywood's romantic formula for defining what it means to be passionate about something (or someone).  

And because I did this for so long, even now, when I am alone with my thoughts considering the question, "What am I passionate about?", I can still struggle to provide an answer. 

Because the Hollywood formula is both backwards and incomplete. 

"Dear world, offer me something I’m passionate about and I’ll show up with all of my energy, effort and care!" 

Where's the commitment? It's easy to show up, but without commitment it's equally as easy to walk away. Because nothing is good enough to earn your passion before you do it. Perhaps, in concept, it’s worthy, but as soon as you closely examine the details, the benefits... and the pitfalls, it’s easy to decide it’s better to wait for a better offer. Or if you already jumped in with both feet, once your feet begin to ache (or wonder) to run off after something else. 

Passion and commitment are inseparable. 

But what if you reverse and complete the formula? 

"Dear world, offer me a chance to contribute, and I’ll commit to work on it, with focus, and once I begin to make progress, I’ll become passionate about it!" 

Committed activity – before passion – measures our craft and calling in terms of contribution, not in a romanticized notion of perfection. Passion comes from feeling needed, from approaching mastery, from doing work that matters. 

To find your passion, commit yourself to doing work that matters. Contribute to the best interest of someone and something else. And feel the rush of being needed, wanted, and trusted. 

Feeling Inadequate?  

Along our journey, maturing adults get tired of the feeling that accompanies growth and learning.

We start calling that feeling, “inadequacy.” 

We’re not good at the new social media platform, we balk at considering a new way to problem solve, we never did bother to learn to play piano… 

Not because we don’t want the results, but because the journey will be difficult. Difficult in the sense that we’ll feel inadequate… 

Which accompanies all gain. 

1. First we believe something can be done. 

2. Then we believe we can’t do it. 

3. And finally, we get better at it. 

It’s the second step that jacks us up. 

If you care enough to make a difference, if you care enough to get better — you should care enough to experience inadequacy again.

Live Nation Music Industry Scholarships Now Accepting 2019 Applicants 

Working with Live Nation, the Music Forward Foundation is opening up it's 2019 Live Nation US Concerts Scholarship program, giving three lucky recipients $30k with which to pursue their careers in the music industry.

In partnership with Live Nation, Music Forward Foundation has opened the window for applications for the 2019 Live Nation US Concerts Scholarship Program. 

The program will award $30,000 in scholarships to three recipients who intend to pursue careers in the music industry. 

The scholarship program, established in 2016, is intended to foster the future of the live entertainment industry by helping the next generation of students learn the core aspects of the concert business, including concert promotion, venue operation, ticketing, sponsorship, e-commerce and artist management. 

“Live Nation supports future leaders in pursuit of a career in the music industry,” said Mark Campana, Chief Operating Officer, Live Nation US Concerts. “Music Forward helps bridge community to industry and we look forward to this year’s group of candidates and continuing to grow this important philanthropic program.” 

To be eligible for a scholarship, an applicant must be a currently enrolled junior or senior at an accredited college or university. A total of three $10,000 scholarships will be awarded to students nationwide in the following areas: 

Steven J. Finkel Service Excellence Scholarship: established in memory of a Live Nation employee who went above and beyond to improve the concert experience for fans, artists and staff, this scholarship is designed to support the ever-growing customer service expectations of fans, artists and employees within the live entertainment industry. 

Tiffany Green Operator Scholarship: established in memory of one of Live Nation’s first female concert production specialists, this scholarship is designed to support women pursuing a career in live entertainment. 

Live Nation US Concerts Scholarship: established to support students interested in the core areas of Live Nation’s business: concert promotion, venue operation, sponsorship, ticketing, e-commerce and artist management. 

The application deadline is March 31, 2019. Scholarship selections will be made by a panel of Live Nation executives and thought leaders across academic, entertainment, civic and corporate sectors. 

Criteria for selection include academic achievement, essay responses, and recommendations. Recipients will be announced in June and awards will be given for the fall 2019 semester. 

For more information, check them out Music Forward’s website.