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How To Make Money Making Music Online 

How To Make Money Making Music Online

If you're like me, a musician whose livelihood as a live concert performer has been erased by the COVID-19 pandemic, you've probably applied for numerous sources of government and private financial relief... and you still haven't received any. I have yet to see an IRS Stimulus check. I've applied twice for an Artist Relief Grant. I've applied for the SBA EIDL and PPP, and although more than a month has passed, I've yet to receive a penny in assistance. I've emailed, called, howled at the moon, but my cries for information and help seem to simply evaporate into the white noise generated by millions like me who are wondering if help will ever come.

Freelancers in the music industry are finding it difficult to secure government assistance during the coronavirus pandemic, finds a new survey conducted by the nonprofit Freelancers Union.

The survey, which was conducted April 22–29, elicited responses from a total of 2,755 freelancers, 411 of whom work in the music and performing arts fields. Of respondents in the latter category, 93% reported that they have lost work as a result of COVID-19, with 34% having lost over $10,000. 

Nonetheless, government assistance has been slow in coming. Of the 85% of music and performing arts freelancers who reported they had applied for government relief as a result of the pandemic, 84% have yet to receive any funding, the results show.

So what can we do?

For me, I've begun teaching music, arts, and music business online from my home. I set up an LLC, opened a bank account, built a website - www.pickeringarts.com, and began by offering free lessons during the month of March. I began charging for lessons in April, but also offer a Pay-What-You-Can option to help people who want to take lessons but have lost income as I have. And I have to tell you... I'm having a blast teaching my new students! While my nascent teaching income won't yet support my family of four, it certainly has provided much needed financial support, unlike the support promised but not delivered by state and federal bureaucracy. 

Below are additional ideas for making money making music online from a blogpost at www.bandzoogle.com. I hope the ideas shared here are both encouraging and practical ideas to help you navigate and stay afloat in our industry's stormy seas. Please feel free to reach out to me with questions, ideas, tips, tricks, or just to say hello.

- Michael Pickering

The following was posted by Dave Cool at Bandzoogle on Apr 29, 2020 in: Music Career Advice, Selling Music Online 

Virtually nothing else in history has shaped the music industry more dramatically than the internet. But as much as it’s played an integral role in countless musicians’ careers, the coronavirus crisis has now put us in a position where, for the first time ever, the internet is our only option to reach music fans. 

The unfortunate reality we have to face is that it could be quite a while before live performances, tours, and festivals will be back in full swing. If gigging has made up a good chunk of your income up until this point, it’s crucial that you start laying the groundwork now to make money from your music online. 

The good news is that once we come out on the other side of this pandemic, all the effort you put in now to supplement your income will continue to pay off over time. So how can you make money with music online? Here are some of the best ways to get started. 

1. Sell music through your website 

If you don’t already have one, you should build a website for your music. It gives you a little slice of the internet that you own and control, and you can also sell music directly to your fans (commission-free through Bandzoogle). 

But more than that, you will own the data and emails you collect through it. This is essential to have long-term success in your career, as you can use that data to let your fans know about new music, upcoming tours, crowdfunding campaigns, and more. 

2. Make your music available through online music retailers 

Fans don’t buy as many digital downloads as they used to, but they can still be a meaningful revenue source for DIY musicians. 

Distributing your music to major online retailers like iTunes and Amazon helps you come across as a more legitimate artist, gives you access to detailed analytics, and gives your fans a convenient way to support you. 

3. Make your music available for streaming 

These days, the vast majority of listening is happening on major streaming platforms like Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play, and Amazon Music. This means that making your songs available on them is essential to reach your current fans, as well as potential new fans. 

We have a long way to go before streaming revenue replaces the money that artists used to make selling physical albums, but the business is growing every year, and it’s income you don’t want to miss out on collecting. 

Once you distribute your music to these platforms, you can boost your stream count with tactics like pre-save campaignsaudio ads, and playlist features. 

Artist: Bandzoogle members Warbringer 

4. Monetize your YouTube channel 

How can a hardworking musician get their hands on some of that sweet, sweet YouTube money? The first and easiest step is to upload all your music to your channel. From there, you need to build up your subscribers and set up YouTube monetization on your account. 

Anytime music you own is used in a YouTube video — whether on your own channel or someone else’s — you’re entitled to collect your fair share of the ad revenue generated by it. A digital distribution company such as CD Baby will help ensure that all the money you’re owed ends up in your bank account. 

5. Finance your next project through crowdfunding 

If you have a supportive fanbase, crowdfunding can be a great way to cover the costs of your project. The key to successful crowdfunding is to build excitement among your most engaged fans by showing them what’s behind the curtain and inviting them into your creative process. It takes a lot of planning and proper budgeting, though, so don’t think of it as a quick fix that’ll solve your immediate cash flow problems. 

6. Offer fan subscriptions 

One of the hardest things about making a living as a musician is that most income streams are unpredictable. Fan subscriptions have emerged as one of the few reliable sources of recurring revenue, making it an especially attractive option for artists in such uncertain times. 

Subscriptions (sometimes referred to as memberships) give your most loyal fans access to exclusive recordings, performances, videos, merch, and rewards in exchange for a small monthly contribution. 

It takes a lot of effort and dedication to consistently churn out new content and creative ideas for rewards, but if you’re up for that sort of challenge, it’s an excellent way to form deeper relationships with your listeners. 

7. Sell tickets to live stream shows 

With venues shut down around the world, music fans are more willing than ever to support artists online right now. Selling access to exclusive live streams of your performances can help you make money without having to leave home. 

Experiment with debuting new material, playing through a beloved album in its entirety, and even taking audience requests to get a better sense of what your fans want to hear. 

Learn more: The complete guide to live streaming for musicians 

8. Offer free live streaming concerts with a tip jar 

If you don’t feel comfortable asking for payment up front for your live stream shows, hosting it for free and setting up a virtual tip jar is a great way to go. 

On Facebook Live and Instagram Live, this can be as simple as sharing your PayPal.Me link, Venmo username, or website link with your viewers. Or you could opt for a platform like Twitch with built-in monetization features. Here’s a full breakdown of how to monetize each of the most popular live streaming platforms

9. Monetize your Facebook and Instagram videos 

A lot of musicians don’t realize that they can earn money when their music is used in videos on Facebook and Instagram, just like on YouTube. You can even get paid when people use your songs in their Instagram Stories. 

Check with your digital distribution company to make sure they offer social video monetization

10. Sell digital merch 

There’s so much more you can include in your band merch store than the standard t-shirts, posters, and stickers. Challenge yourself to think beyond physical goods and explore possibilities like digital sheet music downloads, video lessons, or a nicely designed e-book of your lyrics. 

11. License your music 

Getting your songs licensed for films, TV shows, and ads is easier said than done, but even one placement could be a game changer for your music career. Some musicians earn most or all of their income from licensing alone. 

Hitting the right music supervisor with the right song at the right time certainly involves some luck, but there are a few things you can do to increase your chances

Final thoughts 

Don’t feel like you have to throw yourself into everything at once. Some of these ideas might be more doable for you than others, depending on the kind of musician you are, how far along you are in your career, and what your big-picture goals are. 

Start by exploring just a couple of avenues that excite you the most right now, and double down on whatever seems to be working best for you in the upcoming weeks.

Licensed to Stream? Clearing Rights Can Be Tricky In the 'Wild West' Livestream Age 

Licensed to Stream? Clearing Rights Can Be Tricky In the 'Wild West' Livestream Age

Many of us are, or have musician friends who are, performing cover tunes live on social media platforms as a means to generate income, bring some joy, and stave off cabin fever! Our world needs our live music right now! It keeps us connected, it helps us to feel, to express, to remain in touch with our hearts and humanity. But performing copyrighted material can also be risky because copyright law clearly states that permission from copyright owners must be secured in advance through a variety of licenses. Further complicating the matter is that not all the powers that be can even agree on which licenses must be secured for which purposes! But wait! There's more! Some social media platforms already have licenses in place, while others do not, or have only partial permissions from publishers and copyright owners. The bottom line is that a musician's live online show can get shut down or worse, fines might be imparted!

Clear as mud? 

So how can we keep the music playing while also avoiding copyright infringement issues? This article orginally published in Billboard Magazine can help guide.

With venues closed, more artists are turning to livestream performances — some without the proper licenses. "There's probably a lot of infringement going on." 

To make sure acts like Elton John, Lady Gaga and Billie Eilish could perform the songs they wanted during Global Citizen's April 18 "One World: Together at Home" concert, Julie Wadley and her team worked 12-hour days for over a week. "I woke up early, I worked late," says the owner of Say Yes! Music, who cleared the rights for 130 songs so the event could be streamed live and shown on demand all over the world. 

Over a month into the pandemic shutdown, livestream music performances have evolved from cool curiosities into an essential way for artists to reach fans, and sometimes even make money. Besides the Global Citizen event, which raised $127 million from mostly corporate sponsors for food banks and coronavirus-related causes, Diplo and Major Lazer have performed over a dozen "Corona World Tours" on YouTube for between 17,000 and 88,000 viewers each. A Bandsintown survey showed that almost three-quarters of fans say they'll continue to watch such performances once real-world venues reopen. But as Wadley's workload shows, clearing the necessary rights can be complicated. 

Live performances online, like those at traditional clubs, need public performance licenses from collecting societies like ASCAP and BMI, which platforms like YouTube and Twitch have. Making those same performances available on demand on a continual basis also requires mechanical licenses from publishers — as well as synch licenses if video is involved. (DJs also have to get similar rights to recordings.) 

Mechanical licenses vary in cost: "A couple hundred bucks to a couple thousand bucks, depending on the nature of their use," says Barry Slotnick, a Loeb & Loeb attorney who represents artists, songwriters, labels and publishers. But they require the performer to track down the publisher, which isn't always easy. 

The law isn't always entirely clear, either. Some rights holders believe that all livestream performances involve making a copy, and thus require mechanical rights, or synch rights in the case of video. "It's like the Wild West out there, and some of this is evolving," adds Ben McLane, a music attorney who has represented numerous artists and labels. "You don't always know which of these licenses are applicable or necessary." 

Some of the big platforms, including YouTube and Facebook (which owns Instagram), have the necessary licenses with almost all publishers, so artists don't have to worry about what songs they perform. Other platforms don't. "You've got companies like YouTube and Facebook checking all the boxes, and there are some that say, 'What boxes?' " says a label source. Twitch, which focuses on livestreaming, although not only with music, said in a statement that it "requires users to stream content they have the necessary rights to stream — for example, music they've written or licensed." If that's not the case, rights holders can issue takedown notices under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 

The complexity of the issues can be intimidating. If an online live performance requires a public performance license, and an on-demand stream involves both a public performance license and a mechanical license, what licenses do time-delayed live performances require? "It can be a thicket," says Eleanor Lackman, who handles music litigation for Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp. "There's probably a lot of infringement going on. We've had this flood of use with the stay-at-home orders, and there has to be a lot out there that isn't licensed." 

So far, there haven't been many legal threats — because livestreaming isn't yet a big business and labels and publishers don't want to interfere with their artists trying to make money during a crisis. A representative for a well-known singer who recently performed a livestream says the team didn't bother to clear rights. "We just did it and no one has come after us," says the representative. "No one has contacted us about clearing anything, either." 

Clearing rights can be even more complicated when DJs incorporate snippets of existing recordings into performances. For a recent livestream, Diplo played parts of recordings like Marvin Gaye's "Got To Give It Up," in addition to his own compositions. Since those performances are available on demand, his team has to clear the relevant rights with both publishers (of the compositions) and labels (which own most recordings). In this case, Diplo's manager, Andrew McInnes of TMWRK, managed to pull it off. "The big companies have been helpful and supportive of what we've been doing," says McInnes. "Pre-coronavirus, it was complicated to do things like this, but everyone's working together to keep some positive music experience out in the world right now." 

Publishers say they're doing their best to streamline their licensing processes during the anxious period of no concert revenue. "We're trying to clear as quickly as possible and be as accommodating as possible because of the status of the world," says Kelly Baden, vp worldwide licensing operations at Concord, which administers the publishing for the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization and Leonard Bernstein's catalog. "We have definitely had discussions about, 'How do we take this out of our normal process and expedite this?' " 

As livestreaming grows, however, rights holders will probably balance this kind of goodwill with their desire to get a piece of a promising new business. "If I'm Beyoncé and I say, 'Everybody show up,' and we're going to see her and Jay-Z and the kids playing in their living room, if I were a [label or publishing] executive, would I call them and say, 'I know you had to cancel your tour, and I know that's a loss of income for you, but I want a piece of this'? That's a tough call," says a publishing source. "I'm guessing the executives would say, 'Wait a second, this could be the future.'" 

This article originally appeared in the April 25, 2020 issue of Billboard.

Bandzoogle Now Offers Live Stream Ticket Sale Feature on All Plans 

Bandzoogle Now Offers Live Stream Ticket Sale Feature on All Plans

 

I am both a fan and client of Bandzoogle, the website builder created by musicians for musicians. I've been using their platform to build my websites for a number of years. I've also recommended Banzoogle to DIY students and clients involved in a variety of creative industries. And no, I am not being compensated to promote their services. I'm simply a believer.

Today, Bandzoogle announced that in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the company has updated its ticketing options so that Bandzzoglers can now sell tickets commission-free to live streaming events - directly through their websites. While normally a Pro plan feature, ticket sales will be available on all plans, to all Bandzoogle members during the pandemic.

This feature is a fantastic resource for all of us performing creatives looking to find ways to continue generating revenue while sheltering in place. In fact, I would go so far as to say that being able to generate revenue from digital performances is going to be a significant part of performing artist's futures. 

Many artists are currently relying on Facebook Live and other social media platforms to host and promote their streaming shows. While convenient, relying on platforms one does not own or control is also problematic. There are licensing issues (that won't always be overlooked as they are now), algorithm issues that create audience access unpredictability, TOS, and other uncontrollable components in the social media space. 

Being able to host live streaming events from one's website provides some solutions to the aforementioned problems. It also helps to generate web traffic, build an artist's permission-based database, nurture community, and engagement, all of which can lead to present and future monetization from numerous income verticals. 

There are other live streaming options available, Stageit and Bandsintown being two reputable sources worth looking into. But one of the things I appreciate about Bandzoogle is, as with all of its e-commerce features, selling tickets through your own website is 100% commission-free, forever. That means all revenue goes directly to you. 

Hit me up with any questions or comments. I'm happy to be a resource.

Financial Help For Colorado's Creative Industries Community 

Financial Help For Colorado's Creative Industries Community

Colorado Arts & Culture Community. COVID-19’s impact on Colorado has been widespread. 

The $2 trillion CARE Act is a major economic resource to help Colorado’s small businesses experiencing economic harm. A key portion of this act is the Paycheck Protection Program which allocates $349 billion in forgivable loans to help small businesses, independent contractors and nonprofits meet payroll and rent needs. 

The first step in accessing these forgivable loans is to prepare the materials necessary to apply. That includes confirming your eligibility, gathering the necessary records (payroll, rent, utilities, tax and bank records) and estimating the eligible amount of your forgivable loan. 

For additional details on the Paycheck Protection Program’s forgivable loans and a comprehensive list of state and federal resources available for Colorado’s businesses, visit choosecolorado.com/covid19. OEDIT representatives are available to answer your questions through the COVID Economic Hotline at (303) 860-5881.

An Amazing Opportunity To Be The Solution 

An Amazing Opportunity To Be The Solution

"All I know since yesterday is everything has changed" - TS

Getty Images

Right?!! COVID-19 is rewriting life as we've known it.

As I sit here at home writing this blog post, my amazing wife, Amy is in the other room teaching an online fitness class. One that she used to teach at our local recreation center, now closed. I spent the past two days teaching arts and entertainment lessons, one-on-one to individuals in the same room where my wife is sweating it out. I've been teaching everything from piano, voice, and music theory to music business consulting, and stand-up comedy!

Amy and I have a full in-home and online teaching schedule for the next two weeks, largely due in part to the fact that we're offering our services for free. We're doing this for a few of reasons:

1. - We suddenly have a lot of time on our hands. Our live performances events have all been canceled from coast to coast, at least for the next several months, and the schools we've been teaching in have all been shut-down... indefinitely.

2. - And this is the most important reason, we believe that people shouldn't be denied opportunities to engage in activities they love or in the education they desire. Amy and I want to do what we can during this uncertain time to help keep hope afloat, provide a bit of normalcy and encourage and equip people's passion for music, arts, and entertainment alive and growing.

3. There is also a practical reason. We will soon have little to no income. We have two young, extraordinary daughters to raise and provide for. And, like every one of us, we have financial responsibilities to look after. We plan to continue offering our arts and entertainment teaching and consulting services but doing so for a fee. Our current plan is to offer an hourly rate, a discounted monthly tuition rate, and a "pay-what-you-can" option because we are all in this together, and as I said above, "we believe that people shouldn't be denied opportunities to engage in activities they love or in the education they desire."

The truth is, apart from extending grace, compassion, generosity, and love, none of us is going to get through all of this corona-craziness and thrive. This goes for governments, corporations, associations, institutions, and every individual on the planet. We have a tremendous opportunity to hit a global "reset" button, one day at a time, by investing some of this time we have on our hands in serving one another as we can. 

BE THE SOLUTION. 

I teach my students that the key to success is this very thing - Be The Solution - wherever you are, whoever you're with, in all things. Do this and you will be the person everyone wants to be with, work with, and is inspired by.

Amy and I can teach out of home right now. This is how we can be the solution. 

How can you be the solution? There are things you can do, services you can provide, hope and help you can offer. Right now is THE opportunity, THE time to be someone's hero, someone's champion, to be THE solution.

I want to encourage your awesomeness! Take a look at your awesomeness and consider how you can make the most of this amazing opportunity to be the solution in your home, your community, your city, state, and beyond... however, you are able. The more of us doing this will make the most positive difference in the days, weeks and months ahead. The more of us who are actively solution-engaged will move this world of ours to a better, kinder future. 

And who knows, it might also slow down all the negativity forced upon us day in and out every time we open a web browser!

We all have something needed to offer that is unique to our current scenarios.

We can do this.

I would love to hear how you're being the solution. Please share your story!

Michael

 

React, Respond or Initiate? 

React, Respond or Initiate?

Seth Godin sent the following in an email to his blog subscribers today. I was so encouraged, not only because of the simple yet powerful insight shared but also because of something my wife and I decided to do just last night.I'll get to that following Seth's post. 

React, Respond or Initiate?

That’s pretty much all that’s on offer. 

What will you do next? 

The first gives us visceral satisfaction and emotional release, and it almost always leads to bad outcomes. 

Responding is smarter. It requires each of us to think hard about the action and emotion we seek to create after something is put on our desk. 

And the third? Initiating is ever easier and leveraged than ever before, which, surprisingly, also makes it more difficult to move up on our agenda. 

In normal times, it’s easy to get into a rhythm of simply responding. Someone else setting the agenda. 

When things are uncertain, it’s easy to react. 

But now, right now, is the single best time to initiate. We’re in for a slog, but there will be an end to it. 

Make things better by making better things.

Free Lessons For Our Community

One of the things I teach my creative entrepreneurship students is that in every challenge we face are opportunities to be found. We simply need to step back, look, listen, recognize an opportunity and then start to do something with it.

Our present reality as impacted by necessary measures we are all taking to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 has, for many, suddenly provided us with a lot of time on our hands. Schools are closed, work is shut down, events have been canceled. 

People are frightened and need to find ways to know hope and move forward toward a positive future.

Grace, compassion, generosity, love.

So last night, my wife, Amy and I decided to initiate something...

We decided, with the extra time we now have, to do what we can, with what we have, to bring grace, compassion, generosity, and love to our community.

I posted the following announcement through my social media channels:

Hey SE Aurora, Parker, and surrounding area peeps! Looking for something to do now that school/work is on hold? Amy and I are offering FREE Piano/Voice/Music Theory/Acting/Music-Entertainment Business/ and Performance lessons at our place to help keep life upbeat and on track. Message me if you’re interested! We’ll have some fun!

The response has been amazing! Within the first 30 minutes of posting, I received numerous notes of gratitude and requests to teach creative entrepreneurship lessons, piano, voice, stand-up comedy, music theory, and acting!

Amy and I are overjoyed to be able to invest what we can in our community and share a little grace, compassion, generosity, and love. We're also thrilled to be able to provide alternative activities to mindless, fear and panic feeding, social media scrolling.

Each of us has something we can offer to help one another during this unprecedented time in history. I want to encourage you to consider how you too can initiate something, anything, to help make life a little brighter, a little lighter, and a whole lot more full of hope for those in your communities.

Take the time to find opportunities in the midst of our present challenges. You have more to offer than you may realize.

 

 

 

AMAZON MUSIC OPENS UP STREAMING DATA WITH AMAZON MUSIC FOR ARTISTS APP 

AMAZON MUSIC OPENS UP STREAMING DATA WITH AMAZON MUSIC FOR ARTISTS APP

Here is some much needed good news for today! Amazon Music has announced the long-awaited beta launch of Amazon Music for Artists – a new mobile app for artists and their teams designed to help acts “better understand their business on Amazon Music”.

Guest post by Tim Ingham of Music Business Worldwide

The music streaming landscape just got more transparent.

Available on both iOS and Android, the app serves up information regarding artist streaming performance on Amazon Music’s various tiers, as well as insights into each act’s fanbase. 

According to Amazon, its features include: 

  • New success metrics, including the Daily Voice Index, which illustrates how an artist’s music is performing on Amazon Music with Alexa – including insights into voice requests by artist, album, song, and lyric. 
  • Access to near-real-time streaming data, providing artists with the latest streaming data across their entire catalog. 
  • A fan insights tab, which provides a breakdown of an artist’s most engaged listeners –Fans and Superfans – so they can focus on growing these segments over time. 
  • A custom date filter, so artists can choose specific dates, or length of time to track performance in near-real-time, including the last 24 hours of a release. 

CD Baby is a verification launch partner with Amazon Music for Artists, meaning any artist who is distributed through CD Baby can get expedited access to join.

The launch is coupled with a companion website (artists.amazonmusic.com) where artists and their teams can learn more about the app, as well as opportunity areas, best practices, additional resources, and more. 

In January, Amazon Music confirmed over 55m global ‘customers’ were now using the firm’s various tiers; this number included an estimated subscriber count of approximately 50m, up 16m year-on-year. 

Last August, Amazon Music rival Apple Music launched Apple Music for Artists, which in turn was designed to rival Spotify’s analytics tools. 

And in November, Universal Music Group revealed its own data/insights app. 

The Universal Music Artists (UMA) app can be used to view personalized, global data insights from Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon and YouTube (with data from Deezer set to be included in 2020). 

At launch, Amazon Music for Artists is available globally in English to download via the mobile app store on either Android or iOS

Growing A Music Community Through Instagram Stories  

Growing A Music Community Through Instagram Stories 

Bas Grasmayer walks us through how he was able to cultivate interest in his project Hard Dance Berlin through the persistent use of Instagram stories highlighting the performers and their upcoming shows. 

Guest post by Bas Grasmayer of Music x Tech x Future

Last week I announced the launch of Hard Dance Berlin. Since then, I have been spending a few minutes each day building up the community around it by leveraging Instagram stories (@harddanceberlin). 

I hope by highlighting some of the activities, you’ll find some inspiration for how to grow your own projects. 

Goal & tools 

The Instagram account is very much an extension of the project’s main site. The goal being to highlight performers and events in Berlin’s harder and faster styles of electronic music. 

Instagram is a place where people interested in this already spend their time – as opposed to a random new site – and a tool many of them use to discover events and music. 

Stories’ ephemeral nature make it easy to drip interesting content for this community every day. 

Key principle: support, support, support 

In general, whenever you create something, make sure it solves problems whether they’re your own or other people’s. This should be your primary goal and activity. This is how you shape something valuable. Look for problems; solve them. 

Give more than you take. If you ask for anything in the beginning, then ask people to help you help them. In my case that means soliciting promo material, images, etc. so I can better promote other people’s events to the community. 

The ethos is: support, support, support – the music, the people, the parties and the scenes. Double down on your ethos early on, because things can get muddy later on and there’s always a risk of believing in your own hype once things take off. 

This also makes it easier for people to join and help the community: if there is growth potential in an area, the goal should be to grow everything. If one part of the community grows stronger, we all grow stronger. 

Method & content 

Here are the types of content I currently post to serve the community. I’ll highlight for each one how they help to grow the Instagram: 

  • Short-term highlights (“check out this party tonight”) 
  • Longer-term highlights (“next week xyz”, “just announced next month: x”) 
  • Music highlights (“check out the new mix by xyz”) 

Short-term highlights 

When focusing on events, I try to do the following things: 

Share a picture from the promoter or venue’s Instagram timeline. This helps connect the community to people active in the scene, and it also sends a notification to the account holder and allows them to repost the story to their own stories (in turn giving @harddanceberlin more exposure). 
Tag as many (relevant) people as possible (the event’s performers, promoter, venue, etc). This again provides value for fans to understand what’s going on and helps them check stuff out, but it also means your story can now be shared by anyone who was tagged. 
Location tags. Tagging to a location increases your discoverability for people checking out stories around that area. To be honest, I consider this optional as it usually just gives 1 or 2 more views per story and I’m not sure if it has lead to follows. Sometimes you can get lucky and get hundreds of views though. 
Add the MUSIC one might expect at the event to the story. It’s an important service to the community using the stories to determine whether to investigate an event, but if it’s music by one of the performers, it also makes it more likely they’ll repost your story. 

The ‘growth hacking’ term is leveraging “other people’s audience” (OPA). 

Longer-term highlights 

Longer term highlights focus on events from about a week or so out. It follows a very similar approach as the shorter term highlights, incl. tagging the performers. This allows people from out of town to repost your story to announce to their fans that they’re going to be in town. It also means you can build up some extra hype for particularly interesting events and line-ups. 

The above screenshots also indicate how it only takes me a few minutes per day: for story 1, the artwork was sent to me by the promoter. For story 2, I just reposted one of the promoters’ announcements. For story 3, I made a screenshot of the Resident Advisor calendar I maintain and cropped out irrelevant stuff. 

Music highlights 

On weekdays with zero events (Berlin can be wild and last week actually had a relevant event every night of the week), I’ll highlight music of local producers, DJs, labels, collectives, etc. 

Currently about 50% of all followers see the account’s stories. That’s a high engagement rate and I want to keep it there, so ideally I have something for people daily. It’s also important to keep the growth momentum up. I’ll explain why next. 

Instagram account discovery 

Alright. So, someone I tagged reposted a story. What now? 

I tend to go for really clear names when naming projects. MUSIC x TECH x FUTURE is exactly the scope of the content; it’s what I want to talk and think about. MUSIC x GREEN was actually going to be called MUSIC x SUSTAINABILITY, but the latter word was annoying to type out in a URL. So this is called Hard Dance Berlin – a bit tricky SEO-wise since a big YouTube music channel has done an event in this city by that name once, but it explains exactly what the project is about. 

So when somebody sees the account name when content is reposted, it’s pretty self-explanatory that if you tap on the story and go to the profile, you’re going to get more of hard dance in the context of Berlin. 

So here’s what you’ll see: 

And that’s it. Within two weeks, I should have it organically at 100 highly relevant and engaged followers. By summer, I think I can hit 1k. Should I do some paid promotion, that can go a lot faster. The upside of something as niche as this, is that it is easy to know where to find your audience when targeting ads. 

Maybe it seems highly tactical, or whatever, but the reason why I spend my spare time on it is because of the love for the music. 

Not everything can be done online! I’m too old now to visit all of the events, but I try to make sure to go to a decent portion of them, speak to some people, etc. and also play sometimes. This has helped me get some early visibility with friends following and resharing some of the content. 

I hope the above has been helpful and insightful, and not just blowing my own horn. 

If there’s just one takeaway, let it be this: always give more than you take.

TBT - I Grew Up in the Circus 

Here is a little TBT photo fun -

America's Own Bouncing Pickering Family!

Yes, I grew up in the circus! I did my first show when I was three months old. I think my family my younger sister, Chris and I may have been the original home-schoolers. We traveled around the world extensively before I had begun kindergarten. In fact, my kindergarten teacher called my parents in for a conference at one point because she was concerned that I might be a 5-year old compulsive liar! Mrs. Bogartus told my parents, "Every time I talk to the class about geography, traveling on airplanes, boats, subways, famous structures like the Empire State Building, Statue of Liberty, etc., Mikie raises his hand and tells a story about being there." My parents assured her that these stories were true and that I wasn't a compulsive liar. "Well", she replied, "I don't know if the stories are true, but we sure do love listening to Mikie tell them!"

With a colorful upbringing like the one I was blessed to have, it is no wonder that I have always been in love with music, arts, and entertainment. This world has been my world even before I could walk. It's also why I am so passionate about sharing this world, it's challenges and opportunities, with students and professionals of all ages. There really is no business quite like show business, whether the work is done behind the scenes, center stage, or the center ring.

It is my pleasure and joy to help others make their music and entertainment industry dreams come true. Let me know how I might help you!

MP

michael@mpickeringmusic.com

Michael Pickering, President and Chief Creative Officer of Lionsong Entertainment, Inc., and former Director and founder of the Music and Entertainment Entrepreneurship program at the Community College of Aurora, is a creative leader, entrepreneur, educator, and musician. He holds a Master of Arts in Music Business Degree and a B.P.S. in Interdisciplinary Music Studies Degree from the Berklee College of Music. He has served on the boards of local arts and entertainment organizations, authored post-secondary music curricula, and spoken at many local and national music industry events. He also provides music and entertainment business and performance consulting services (www.mpickeringmusic.com). Michael and his wife, Amy Pickering, remain active as national headline music and clean comedy performing artists for corporate, theatrical, educational, outreach, cruise, and private clients worldwide — www.michaelandamy.com.

 

Tell @Spotify and @AmazonMusic to #StopFightingSongwriters 

Tell @Spotify and @AmazonMusic to #StopFightingSongwriters

Songwriters - You must develop and flex your music business muscles or you’ll continue to be pinned down by those who do not have your best interests at heart. On Instagram tell @Spotify and @AmazonMusic to #StopFightingSongwriters