Viewing: Facebook - View all posts

How To Make Money Making Music Online 

How To Make Money Making Music Online

If you're like me, a musician whose livelihood as a live concert performer has been erased by the COVID-19 pandemic, you've probably applied for numerous sources of government and private financial relief... and you still haven't received any. I have yet to see an IRS Stimulus check. I've applied twice for an Artist Relief Grant. I've applied for the SBA EIDL and PPP, and although more than a month has passed, I've yet to receive a penny in assistance. I've emailed, called, howled at the moon, but my cries for information and help seem to simply evaporate into the white noise generated by millions like me who are wondering if help will ever come.

Freelancers in the music industry are finding it difficult to secure government assistance during the coronavirus pandemic, finds a new survey conducted by the nonprofit Freelancers Union.

The survey, which was conducted April 22–29, elicited responses from a total of 2,755 freelancers, 411 of whom work in the music and performing arts fields. Of respondents in the latter category, 93% reported that they have lost work as a result of COVID-19, with 34% having lost over $10,000. 

Nonetheless, government assistance has been slow in coming. Of the 85% of music and performing arts freelancers who reported they had applied for government relief as a result of the pandemic, 84% have yet to receive any funding, the results show.

So what can we do?

For me, I've begun teaching music, arts, and music business online from my home. I set up an LLC, opened a bank account, built a website - www.pickeringarts.com, and began by offering free lessons during the month of March. I began charging for lessons in April, but also offer a Pay-What-You-Can option to help people who want to take lessons but have lost income as I have. And I have to tell you... I'm having a blast teaching my new students! While my nascent teaching income won't yet support my family of four, it certainly has provided much needed financial support, unlike the support promised but not delivered by state and federal bureaucracy. 

Below are additional ideas for making money making music online from a blogpost at www.bandzoogle.com. I hope the ideas shared here are both encouraging and practical ideas to help you navigate and stay afloat in our industry's stormy seas. Please feel free to reach out to me with questions, ideas, tips, tricks, or just to say hello.

- Michael Pickering

The following was posted by Dave Cool at Bandzoogle on Apr 29, 2020 in: Music Career Advice, Selling Music Online 

Virtually nothing else in history has shaped the music industry more dramatically than the internet. But as much as it’s played an integral role in countless musicians’ careers, the coronavirus crisis has now put us in a position where, for the first time ever, the internet is our only option to reach music fans. 

The unfortunate reality we have to face is that it could be quite a while before live performances, tours, and festivals will be back in full swing. If gigging has made up a good chunk of your income up until this point, it’s crucial that you start laying the groundwork now to make money from your music online. 

The good news is that once we come out on the other side of this pandemic, all the effort you put in now to supplement your income will continue to pay off over time. So how can you make money with music online? Here are some of the best ways to get started. 

1. Sell music through your website 

If you don’t already have one, you should build a website for your music. It gives you a little slice of the internet that you own and control, and you can also sell music directly to your fans (commission-free through Bandzoogle). 

But more than that, you will own the data and emails you collect through it. This is essential to have long-term success in your career, as you can use that data to let your fans know about new music, upcoming tours, crowdfunding campaigns, and more. 

2. Make your music available through online music retailers 

Fans don’t buy as many digital downloads as they used to, but they can still be a meaningful revenue source for DIY musicians. 

Distributing your music to major online retailers like iTunes and Amazon helps you come across as a more legitimate artist, gives you access to detailed analytics, and gives your fans a convenient way to support you. 

3. Make your music available for streaming 

These days, the vast majority of listening is happening on major streaming platforms like Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play, and Amazon Music. This means that making your songs available on them is essential to reach your current fans, as well as potential new fans. 

We have a long way to go before streaming revenue replaces the money that artists used to make selling physical albums, but the business is growing every year, and it’s income you don’t want to miss out on collecting. 

Once you distribute your music to these platforms, you can boost your stream count with tactics like pre-save campaignsaudio ads, and playlist features. 

Artist: Bandzoogle members Warbringer 

4. Monetize your YouTube channel 

How can a hardworking musician get their hands on some of that sweet, sweet YouTube money? The first and easiest step is to upload all your music to your channel. From there, you need to build up your subscribers and set up YouTube monetization on your account. 

Anytime music you own is used in a YouTube video — whether on your own channel or someone else’s — you’re entitled to collect your fair share of the ad revenue generated by it. A digital distribution company such as CD Baby will help ensure that all the money you’re owed ends up in your bank account. 

5. Finance your next project through crowdfunding 

If you have a supportive fanbase, crowdfunding can be a great way to cover the costs of your project. The key to successful crowdfunding is to build excitement among your most engaged fans by showing them what’s behind the curtain and inviting them into your creative process. It takes a lot of planning and proper budgeting, though, so don’t think of it as a quick fix that’ll solve your immediate cash flow problems. 

6. Offer fan subscriptions 

One of the hardest things about making a living as a musician is that most income streams are unpredictable. Fan subscriptions have emerged as one of the few reliable sources of recurring revenue, making it an especially attractive option for artists in such uncertain times. 

Subscriptions (sometimes referred to as memberships) give your most loyal fans access to exclusive recordings, performances, videos, merch, and rewards in exchange for a small monthly contribution. 

It takes a lot of effort and dedication to consistently churn out new content and creative ideas for rewards, but if you’re up for that sort of challenge, it’s an excellent way to form deeper relationships with your listeners. 

7. Sell tickets to live stream shows 

With venues shut down around the world, music fans are more willing than ever to support artists online right now. Selling access to exclusive live streams of your performances can help you make money without having to leave home. 

Experiment with debuting new material, playing through a beloved album in its entirety, and even taking audience requests to get a better sense of what your fans want to hear. 

Learn more: The complete guide to live streaming for musicians 

8. Offer free live streaming concerts with a tip jar 

If you don’t feel comfortable asking for payment up front for your live stream shows, hosting it for free and setting up a virtual tip jar is a great way to go. 

On Facebook Live and Instagram Live, this can be as simple as sharing your PayPal.Me link, Venmo username, or website link with your viewers. Or you could opt for a platform like Twitch with built-in monetization features. Here’s a full breakdown of how to monetize each of the most popular live streaming platforms

9. Monetize your Facebook and Instagram videos 

A lot of musicians don’t realize that they can earn money when their music is used in videos on Facebook and Instagram, just like on YouTube. You can even get paid when people use your songs in their Instagram Stories. 

Check with your digital distribution company to make sure they offer social video monetization

10. Sell digital merch 

There’s so much more you can include in your band merch store than the standard t-shirts, posters, and stickers. Challenge yourself to think beyond physical goods and explore possibilities like digital sheet music downloads, video lessons, or a nicely designed e-book of your lyrics. 

11. License your music 

Getting your songs licensed for films, TV shows, and ads is easier said than done, but even one placement could be a game changer for your music career. Some musicians earn most or all of their income from licensing alone. 

Hitting the right music supervisor with the right song at the right time certainly involves some luck, but there are a few things you can do to increase your chances

Final thoughts 

Don’t feel like you have to throw yourself into everything at once. Some of these ideas might be more doable for you than others, depending on the kind of musician you are, how far along you are in your career, and what your big-picture goals are. 

Start by exploring just a couple of avenues that excite you the most right now, and double down on whatever seems to be working best for you in the upcoming weeks.

Licensed to Stream? Clearing Rights Can Be Tricky In the 'Wild West' Livestream Age 

Licensed to Stream? Clearing Rights Can Be Tricky In the 'Wild West' Livestream Age

Many of us are, or have musician friends who are, performing cover tunes live on social media platforms as a means to generate income, bring some joy, and stave off cabin fever! Our world needs our live music right now! It keeps us connected, it helps us to feel, to express, to remain in touch with our hearts and humanity. But performing copyrighted material can also be risky because copyright law clearly states that permission from copyright owners must be secured in advance through a variety of licenses. Further complicating the matter is that not all the powers that be can even agree on which licenses must be secured for which purposes! But wait! There's more! Some social media platforms already have licenses in place, while others do not, or have only partial permissions from publishers and copyright owners. The bottom line is that a musician's live online show can get shut down or worse, fines might be imparted!

Clear as mud? 

So how can we keep the music playing while also avoiding copyright infringement issues? This article orginally published in Billboard Magazine can help guide.

With venues closed, more artists are turning to livestream performances — some without the proper licenses. "There's probably a lot of infringement going on." 

To make sure acts like Elton John, Lady Gaga and Billie Eilish could perform the songs they wanted during Global Citizen's April 18 "One World: Together at Home" concert, Julie Wadley and her team worked 12-hour days for over a week. "I woke up early, I worked late," says the owner of Say Yes! Music, who cleared the rights for 130 songs so the event could be streamed live and shown on demand all over the world. 

Over a month into the pandemic shutdown, livestream music performances have evolved from cool curiosities into an essential way for artists to reach fans, and sometimes even make money. Besides the Global Citizen event, which raised $127 million from mostly corporate sponsors for food banks and coronavirus-related causes, Diplo and Major Lazer have performed over a dozen "Corona World Tours" on YouTube for between 17,000 and 88,000 viewers each. A Bandsintown survey showed that almost three-quarters of fans say they'll continue to watch such performances once real-world venues reopen. But as Wadley's workload shows, clearing the necessary rights can be complicated. 

Live performances online, like those at traditional clubs, need public performance licenses from collecting societies like ASCAP and BMI, which platforms like YouTube and Twitch have. Making those same performances available on demand on a continual basis also requires mechanical licenses from publishers — as well as synch licenses if video is involved. (DJs also have to get similar rights to recordings.) 

Mechanical licenses vary in cost: "A couple hundred bucks to a couple thousand bucks, depending on the nature of their use," says Barry Slotnick, a Loeb & Loeb attorney who represents artists, songwriters, labels and publishers. But they require the performer to track down the publisher, which isn't always easy. 

The law isn't always entirely clear, either. Some rights holders believe that all livestream performances involve making a copy, and thus require mechanical rights, or synch rights in the case of video. "It's like the Wild West out there, and some of this is evolving," adds Ben McLane, a music attorney who has represented numerous artists and labels. "You don't always know which of these licenses are applicable or necessary." 

Some of the big platforms, including YouTube and Facebook (which owns Instagram), have the necessary licenses with almost all publishers, so artists don't have to worry about what songs they perform. Other platforms don't. "You've got companies like YouTube and Facebook checking all the boxes, and there are some that say, 'What boxes?' " says a label source. Twitch, which focuses on livestreaming, although not only with music, said in a statement that it "requires users to stream content they have the necessary rights to stream — for example, music they've written or licensed." If that's not the case, rights holders can issue takedown notices under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 

The complexity of the issues can be intimidating. If an online live performance requires a public performance license, and an on-demand stream involves both a public performance license and a mechanical license, what licenses do time-delayed live performances require? "It can be a thicket," says Eleanor Lackman, who handles music litigation for Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp. "There's probably a lot of infringement going on. We've had this flood of use with the stay-at-home orders, and there has to be a lot out there that isn't licensed." 

So far, there haven't been many legal threats — because livestreaming isn't yet a big business and labels and publishers don't want to interfere with their artists trying to make money during a crisis. A representative for a well-known singer who recently performed a livestream says the team didn't bother to clear rights. "We just did it and no one has come after us," says the representative. "No one has contacted us about clearing anything, either." 

Clearing rights can be even more complicated when DJs incorporate snippets of existing recordings into performances. For a recent livestream, Diplo played parts of recordings like Marvin Gaye's "Got To Give It Up," in addition to his own compositions. Since those performances are available on demand, his team has to clear the relevant rights with both publishers (of the compositions) and labels (which own most recordings). In this case, Diplo's manager, Andrew McInnes of TMWRK, managed to pull it off. "The big companies have been helpful and supportive of what we've been doing," says McInnes. "Pre-coronavirus, it was complicated to do things like this, but everyone's working together to keep some positive music experience out in the world right now." 

Publishers say they're doing their best to streamline their licensing processes during the anxious period of no concert revenue. "We're trying to clear as quickly as possible and be as accommodating as possible because of the status of the world," says Kelly Baden, vp worldwide licensing operations at Concord, which administers the publishing for the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization and Leonard Bernstein's catalog. "We have definitely had discussions about, 'How do we take this out of our normal process and expedite this?' " 

As livestreaming grows, however, rights holders will probably balance this kind of goodwill with their desire to get a piece of a promising new business. "If I'm Beyoncé and I say, 'Everybody show up,' and we're going to see her and Jay-Z and the kids playing in their living room, if I were a [label or publishing] executive, would I call them and say, 'I know you had to cancel your tour, and I know that's a loss of income for you, but I want a piece of this'? That's a tough call," says a publishing source. "I'm guessing the executives would say, 'Wait a second, this could be the future.'" 

This article originally appeared in the April 25, 2020 issue of Billboard.

7 Useful Tips For Optimizing Your Facebook And Instagram Live Videos  

7 Useful Tips For Optimizing Your Facebook And Instagram Live Videos 

If marketing is king then social media video marketing is King Kong!

I found this to be a helpful bit of information for DIYers wanting to take advantage of live video marketing through Facebook and Instagram. Check out this guest post by Victor Blasco

Social media’s live videos are an extremely useful – and popular – marketing tool. Audiences love to engage with artists and content creators that use them, and bands and musicians can leverage the immediacy of the format to showcase a  more approachable side. But carrying out a successful live video can be challenging. In this piece, we go over the crucial elements you should account for 

Social video killed the radio star: for any musician nowadays, being active in social media is not only advisable; it is crucial. 

Most of your existing and future fans are also Facebook and/or Instagram users. So, neglecting your digital presence there equals missing a golden opportunity to strengthen your brand and expand your audience! 

But being there is just the start. 

An effective social media presence calls for you to constantly engage with your followers, especially for those in the music industry. And there’s simply no better way to achieve that level of interaction than through live videos. 

There’s a reason why Facebook ranks live streams highest in people’s feed, and why experienced video companies always factor them into their strategies. But doing live streaming right can be a daunting task. 

So today, I’m going to share with you some useful tips, tricks, and pro secrets you can use to get the most out of this incredible tool in your repertoire. 

Shall we dive in? 

#1 – Planning A Broadcast 

A crucial point in creating any successful piece of content is knowing exactly who it’s directed to. As many of your decisions will hinge on your fans’ preferences and lifestyle. From high-brow ones like the level of interaction, you’ll have with chat, to more practical ones such as which network you should go for, or the ideal time to stream. 

Another aspect you’ll want to decide beforehand is what the stream will be based around. There are no hard and fast rules about this, but here are a few ideas your fans would undoubtedly enjoy: 

•         Broadcast a few practice tunes, or play music in an unusual spot. 

•         Show the behind the scenes of a video clip production or practice session. 

•         Host a video explaining the meaning behind a song, or how you got into music (You can also use an Ask Me Anything format for these). 

•        Invite a colleague to collaborate with you and stream together. It will help both of you increase your follower counts. 

Whatever the theme though, make sure it meets these criteria: being compelling and relevant to people interested in your work. 

#2 – Promote Ahead of Time 

A few days before the streaming, start announcing it to your followers. To pique their interest from the get-go, use interesting wording and visuals alongside your announcements and reminders. 

On the day of the stream, remind your audience of the event a few hours beforehand. You can avoid sounding too promotional by posting about how anxious or excited you are about it, or showing some teaser content. 

That said, the best method for ensuring your fans know about your broadcast is to start streaming regularly and sticking to a schedule – Which can even help you maintain a relevant presence even when you are not doing many shows or have new releases. 

Do keep in mind that too much exposure can end up being counterproductive, though. So keep these streams reasonably spaced to keep the flame alive! 

#3 – Keep In Mind Before Going Live 

Have you noticed how cohesive an explainer video’s narrative feels? Well, while your streams will be neither recorded nor edited, you should still strive to keep a similar level of consistency! 

How? You may ask… Well, the core precept behind live streaming is its freshness. So, scripting your content is not really an option. However, you should definitely outline your stream ahead of time, all with relevant keywords, potential transitions, and cues. 

Doing so will keep you from getting lost in the middle of the stream, and should give you a better handle on the whole thing. 

Also, try and make sure your environment is conducive to a great streaming experience! 

The background should be attractive and distinctive, but not distracting. Indoors, favor harmonic frame compositions, being mindful of your place in the frame. Visually symmetrical spaces are the most pleasant to see. 

Other technical factors you can’t overlook pre-stream are lighting and sound/acoustics – particularly if you are going to perform! 

For instance, you can use natural light filming close to a window or in an exterior location. Check that the lighting is not too direct. If that’s the case, you can soften it with light diffusers. 

If the sound quality plays a significant role in your stream, prepare your space acoustically, reducing the reverberation and external noise. The latter is especially detrimental in outdoor locations, so recording a bit ahead of time to optimize it is advisable. And on that note… 

#4 – Practice Makes Perfect! 

Even if you don’t suffer from camera shyness – and, as a musician, you shouldn’t – you can benefit remarkably from dry running your video. In fact, you’ll notice a significant difference in the way you handle yourself in front of the camera right from the beginning. 

The actual streaming won’t be the same as a controlled rehearsal. Nonetheless, try to conduct practice runs as realistically as possible. Simulate answering questions, welcoming new viewers, and reintroducing yourself and the subject from time to time. Request a friend to offer you constructive feedback, or do it yourself by recording the dry runs and pinpointing your weak points. 

Strengthen your camera presence by looking straight at the lens, as if you were looking into a person’s eyes. That is unbelievably powerful for engaging your viewers. 

#5 – Branding In Your Live Streams 

Being yourself is not only an empowering piece of advice. It’s also an excellent marketing strategy. 

Your audience is attracted to your unique style for a reason. That’s why you should let it shine throughout the whole stream. It should be reflected in the setting, in your outfit, in the way you talk, and of course, in your music. 

Doing so helps you sound natural, and that alone can put you ahead of many other streamers. It’s pretty noticeable when somebody is forcing a faux personality or trying to seem like a presenter. They do this to appear more professional, but it’s most often than not the wrong way to approach this. 

Just like a brand would do, emphasize the uniqueness that distinguishes you from the rest! 

#6 – Call To Actions Appropriate To The Format 

In case you are not familiar with this marketing term, a Call To Action is anything that prompts the audience to take action. A core principle of successful marketing and promotional efforts! 

What “something” means exactly varies with your goals. Commenting, sharing, visiting your website, downloading your new single, or attending to your show, are popular goals that can be attached to CTAs. 

Live streaming CTAs tend to focus on engaging the audience. You may encourage them to suggest songs or topics, to vote, or to ask you questions. Demonstrate appreciation by taking their opinion into account, thanking them, and reading their comments out loud. Those little rewarding gestures make people feel valued and are great motivators to foster online engagement. 

Anyhow, merely mentioning a CTA during the streaming is not enough. It’s vital to remind your viewers about it in the comment section as well, and direct them to what you’d want them to do at key points in the stream: shortly after starting, at the midpoint, and most definitely when you wrap up the stream. 

#7 – Connect & Thrive 

I can’t stress enough how critical it is to connect with your audience when streaming. 

As mentioned earlier, the primary fuel behind social media is interaction. It’s not a one-way channel, so don’t just use it as a one-way content storage service. 

Seize every chance you have of connecting with your fans. Keep an eye on the comments for a while after a stream and answer their comments, respond to their questions, even invite them by name to your future streams. These small personal touches can make a huge difference in how the audience engages with your content and social presence. 

In short, make them know that they are important to you. 

Final Thoughts 

Creating a successful live stream is not an easy task. However, it is a tool that blossoming musicians from a few decades ago would have killed to have! It enables you to cut out the middle-man and market your music persona, with a low-cost, and with superb results. 

What matters the most is to be authentic and fresh. Being so, the connection with your fans will come along, without having to force it. 

Even though streaming will be hard at the beginning, I can assure you’ll end up enjoying it a lot. There’s something deeply gratifying about connecting with your audience, regardless of the professional benefits it generates as well.

Victor Blasco is an audiovisual designer, video marketing expert, and founder/CEO of the explainer video company Yum Yum Videos. Besides running the business, he’s a lifelong student of Chinese philosophy and a passionate geek for all things sci-fi.

 

Show Business is a Lot More Business Than Show - I Can Help 

Show Business is a Lot More Business Than Show - I Can Help

For most of us, making a full-time living making music is the goal. But in order to achieve this, it is essential to identify whether or not you're on the right track. 

As an exercise, think for a moment about why you're not currently making a full-time living making music... 

  • Do you know how to make a full-time living making music? 
  • Do you have a strategy for getting started and building a sustainable music career? 
  • Do you understand the different income streams available to you? 
  • Do you have a strategy for growing and nurturing a community of fans and followers? 
  • Do you have a strategy for monetizing your community? 
  • Are you marketing effectively? 
  • Do you have clarity about to whom you should be marketing and how? 

I would love to talk with you, hear your story, and help you move your career forward. If this sounds interesting to you, contact me today and let's create a plan to help you make a living making music.

Contact me today for a free no-obligation consultation.

Michael Pickering, M.A., Music Business, ACUE 

BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Michael Pickering, President and Chief Creative Officer of Lionsong Entertainment, Inc., and former Director and founder of the Music and Entertainment Entrepreneurship program at the Community College of Aurora, is a creative leader, entrepreneur, educator, and musician. He holds a Master of Arts in Music Business Degree and a B.P.S. in Interdisciplinary Music Studies Degree from the Berklee College of Music. He has served on the boards of local arts and entertainment organizations, authored post-secondary music curricula, and spoken at many local and national music industry events. He also provides music and entertainment business and performance consulting services (www.mpickeringmusic.com). Michael and his wife, Amy Pickering, remain active as national headline music and clean comedy performing artists for corporate, theatrical, educational, outreach, cruise, and private clients worldwide — www.michaelandamy.com.

Spotify Invests $10M In Facebook's Libra Cryptocurrency  

Spotify Invests $10M In Facebook's Libra Cryptocurrency

Spotify has officially joined Facebook's new Libra global cryptocurrency initiative. Spotify stands out as the only music or media company among 28 A-list players ranging from Visa to Uber to Andreessen Horowitz that each invested $10 million. 

Here's of Techcrunch describes Libra: "Facebook wants to make Libra the evolution of PayPal. It’s hoping Libra will become simpler to set up, more ubiquitous as a payment method, more efficient with fewer fees, more accessible to the unbanked, more flexible thanks to developers, and more long-lasting through decentralization." 

All that delivered locally on a global scale and with bitcoin tracking built in, and you get some idea of what a massive project this is. 

Why Spotify? 

For Spotify, Libra offers a chance to more easily receive payments globally, including from the many outside the banking system.  Someday soon, Libra could facilitate payments to artists and rights holders, as well. 

Alex Norström, our Chief Premium Business Officer, explains: 

“One challenge for Spotify and its users around the world has been the lack of easily accessible payment systems – especially for those in financially underserved markets. This creates an enormous barrier to the bonds we work to foster between creators and their fans. In joining the Libra Association, there is an opportunity to better reach Spotify’s total addressable market, eliminate friction and enable payments in mass scale.”

Amazon’s Ad Supported Strategy Goes Way Beyond Music 

Amazon is reportedly close to launching an ad supported streaming music offering. Spotify’s stock price took an instant tumble. But the real story here is much bigger than the knee-jerk reactions of Spotify investors. What we are seeing here is Amazon upping the ante on a bold and ambitious ad revenue strategy that is helping to reformat the tech major landscape. The long-term implications of this may be that it is Facebook that should be worrying, not Spotify. 

Guest Post By MIDiA analyst Mark Mulligan from his Music Industry blog 

In 2018 Amazon generated $10.1 billion in advertising revenue, which represented 4.3% of Amazon’s total revenue base. While this is still a minor revenue stream for Amazon, it is growing at a fast rate, more than doubling in 2018 while all other Amazon revenue collectively grew by just 29%. Amazon’s ad business is growing faster than the core revenue base, to the extent that advertising accounted for 10% of all of Amazon’s growth in 2018. 

"Spotify builds audiences to deliver them music (and then monetize), Amazon is now building audiences in order to sell advertising" 

Amazon is creating new places to sell advertising 

The majority of Amazon’s 2018 ad revenue came from selling inventory on its main platform. This entails having retailers advertise directly to consumers on Amazon, so that Amazon gets to charge its merchants for the privilege of finding consumers to sell to, the final transaction of which it then also takes a cut of. In short, Amazon gets a share of the upside (i.e. the transaction) and of the downside (i.e. ad money spent on consumers who do not buy). This compressed, redefined purchase funnel is part of a wider digital marketing trend and underlines one of MIDiA’s Four Marketing Principles. 

But as smart a business segment as that might be to Amazon, it inherently skews towards the transactional end of marketing, and is less focused on big brand marketing, which is where the big ad dollar deals lie. TV and radio are two of the traditional homes of brand marketing and that is where Amazon has its sights set, or rather on digital successors for both: 

Video: Amazon’s key video property Prime Video is ad free. However, it has been using sports as a vehicle for building out its ad sales capabilities and has so far sold ads against the NFL’s Thursday Night Football. It also appears to be poised to roll this out much further. However, Amazon’s key move was the January launch of an entire ad-supported video platform, IMDb Freedive. Amazon has full intentions to become a major player in the video ad business. 
Music: Thus far, Amazon’s music business has been built around bundles (Prime Music) and subscriptions (Music Unlimited). Should it go the ad-supported route, Amazon will be replicating its video strategy to create a means for building new audiences and new revenue. 

It’s all about the ad revenue 

Right now, Amazon is a small player in the global digital ad business, with just 6% of all tech major ad revenue. However, it is growing fast and has Facebook in its sights. Facebook’s $50 billion of ad revenue in 2018 will feel like an eminently achievable target for a company that grew from $2.9 billion to $10.1 billion in just two years. 

To get there, Amazon is committing to a bold, multi-platform audience building strategy. Whereas Spotify builds audiences to deliver them music (and then monetize), Amazon is now building audiences in order to sell advertising. That may feel like a subtle nuance, but it is a critical strategic difference. In Spotify’s and Netflix’s content-first models, content strategy rules and business models can flex to support the content and the ecosystems needed to support that content. In an ad-first model, the focus is firmly on the revenue model, with content a means to an end rather than the end. (Of course, Amazon is also pursuing the content-first approach with its premium products.) 

Amazon is becoming the company to watch 

So, while Spotify investors were right to get twitchy at the Amazon rumours, it is Facebook investors who should be paying the closest attention. Amazon’s intent is much bigger than competing with Spotify. It is to overtake Facebook as the second biggest global ad business. None of this means that Spotify won’t find some of its ad supported business becoming collateral damage in Amazon’s meta strategy – a meta strategy that is fast singling Amazon out as the boldest of the tech majors, while its peers either ape its approach (Apple) or consolidate around core competences (Google and Facebook). Amazon is fast becoming THE company to watch on global digital stage.