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How To Make Money Making Music Online 

How To Make Money Making Music Online

If you're like me, a musician whose livelihood as a live concert performer has been erased by the COVID-19 pandemic, you've probably applied for numerous sources of government and private financial relief... and you still haven't received any. I have yet to see an IRS Stimulus check. I've applied twice for an Artist Relief Grant. I've applied for the SBA EIDL and PPP, and although more than a month has passed, I've yet to receive a penny in assistance. I've emailed, called, howled at the moon, but my cries for information and help seem to simply evaporate into the white noise generated by millions like me who are wondering if help will ever come.

Freelancers in the music industry are finding it difficult to secure government assistance during the coronavirus pandemic, finds a new survey conducted by the nonprofit Freelancers Union.

The survey, which was conducted April 22–29, elicited responses from a total of 2,755 freelancers, 411 of whom work in the music and performing arts fields. Of respondents in the latter category, 93% reported that they have lost work as a result of COVID-19, with 34% having lost over $10,000. 

Nonetheless, government assistance has been slow in coming. Of the 85% of music and performing arts freelancers who reported they had applied for government relief as a result of the pandemic, 84% have yet to receive any funding, the results show.

So what can we do?

For me, I've begun teaching music, arts, and music business online from my home. I set up an LLC, opened a bank account, built a website - www.pickeringarts.com, and began by offering free lessons during the month of March. I began charging for lessons in April, but also offer a Pay-What-You-Can option to help people who want to take lessons but have lost income as I have. And I have to tell you... I'm having a blast teaching my new students! While my nascent teaching income won't yet support my family of four, it certainly has provided much needed financial support, unlike the support promised but not delivered by state and federal bureaucracy. 

Below are additional ideas for making money making music online from a blogpost at www.bandzoogle.com. I hope the ideas shared here are both encouraging and practical ideas to help you navigate and stay afloat in our industry's stormy seas. Please feel free to reach out to me with questions, ideas, tips, tricks, or just to say hello.

- Michael Pickering

The following was posted by Dave Cool at Bandzoogle on Apr 29, 2020 in: Music Career Advice, Selling Music Online 

Virtually nothing else in history has shaped the music industry more dramatically than the internet. But as much as it’s played an integral role in countless musicians’ careers, the coronavirus crisis has now put us in a position where, for the first time ever, the internet is our only option to reach music fans. 

The unfortunate reality we have to face is that it could be quite a while before live performances, tours, and festivals will be back in full swing. If gigging has made up a good chunk of your income up until this point, it’s crucial that you start laying the groundwork now to make money from your music online. 

The good news is that once we come out on the other side of this pandemic, all the effort you put in now to supplement your income will continue to pay off over time. So how can you make money with music online? Here are some of the best ways to get started. 

1. Sell music through your website 

If you don’t already have one, you should build a website for your music. It gives you a little slice of the internet that you own and control, and you can also sell music directly to your fans (commission-free through Bandzoogle). 

But more than that, you will own the data and emails you collect through it. This is essential to have long-term success in your career, as you can use that data to let your fans know about new music, upcoming tours, crowdfunding campaigns, and more. 

2. Make your music available through online music retailers 

Fans don’t buy as many digital downloads as they used to, but they can still be a meaningful revenue source for DIY musicians. 

Distributing your music to major online retailers like iTunes and Amazon helps you come across as a more legitimate artist, gives you access to detailed analytics, and gives your fans a convenient way to support you. 

3. Make your music available for streaming 

These days, the vast majority of listening is happening on major streaming platforms like Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play, and Amazon Music. This means that making your songs available on them is essential to reach your current fans, as well as potential new fans. 

We have a long way to go before streaming revenue replaces the money that artists used to make selling physical albums, but the business is growing every year, and it’s income you don’t want to miss out on collecting. 

Once you distribute your music to these platforms, you can boost your stream count with tactics like pre-save campaignsaudio ads, and playlist features. 

Artist: Bandzoogle members Warbringer 

4. Monetize your YouTube channel 

How can a hardworking musician get their hands on some of that sweet, sweet YouTube money? The first and easiest step is to upload all your music to your channel. From there, you need to build up your subscribers and set up YouTube monetization on your account. 

Anytime music you own is used in a YouTube video — whether on your own channel or someone else’s — you’re entitled to collect your fair share of the ad revenue generated by it. A digital distribution company such as CD Baby will help ensure that all the money you’re owed ends up in your bank account. 

5. Finance your next project through crowdfunding 

If you have a supportive fanbase, crowdfunding can be a great way to cover the costs of your project. The key to successful crowdfunding is to build excitement among your most engaged fans by showing them what’s behind the curtain and inviting them into your creative process. It takes a lot of planning and proper budgeting, though, so don’t think of it as a quick fix that’ll solve your immediate cash flow problems. 

6. Offer fan subscriptions 

One of the hardest things about making a living as a musician is that most income streams are unpredictable. Fan subscriptions have emerged as one of the few reliable sources of recurring revenue, making it an especially attractive option for artists in such uncertain times. 

Subscriptions (sometimes referred to as memberships) give your most loyal fans access to exclusive recordings, performances, videos, merch, and rewards in exchange for a small monthly contribution. 

It takes a lot of effort and dedication to consistently churn out new content and creative ideas for rewards, but if you’re up for that sort of challenge, it’s an excellent way to form deeper relationships with your listeners. 

7. Sell tickets to live stream shows 

With venues shut down around the world, music fans are more willing than ever to support artists online right now. Selling access to exclusive live streams of your performances can help you make money without having to leave home. 

Experiment with debuting new material, playing through a beloved album in its entirety, and even taking audience requests to get a better sense of what your fans want to hear. 

Learn more: The complete guide to live streaming for musicians 

8. Offer free live streaming concerts with a tip jar 

If you don’t feel comfortable asking for payment up front for your live stream shows, hosting it for free and setting up a virtual tip jar is a great way to go. 

On Facebook Live and Instagram Live, this can be as simple as sharing your PayPal.Me link, Venmo username, or website link with your viewers. Or you could opt for a platform like Twitch with built-in monetization features. Here’s a full breakdown of how to monetize each of the most popular live streaming platforms

9. Monetize your Facebook and Instagram videos 

A lot of musicians don’t realize that they can earn money when their music is used in videos on Facebook and Instagram, just like on YouTube. You can even get paid when people use your songs in their Instagram Stories. 

Check with your digital distribution company to make sure they offer social video monetization

10. Sell digital merch 

There’s so much more you can include in your band merch store than the standard t-shirts, posters, and stickers. Challenge yourself to think beyond physical goods and explore possibilities like digital sheet music downloads, video lessons, or a nicely designed e-book of your lyrics. 

11. License your music 

Getting your songs licensed for films, TV shows, and ads is easier said than done, but even one placement could be a game changer for your music career. Some musicians earn most or all of their income from licensing alone. 

Hitting the right music supervisor with the right song at the right time certainly involves some luck, but there are a few things you can do to increase your chances

Final thoughts 

Don’t feel like you have to throw yourself into everything at once. Some of these ideas might be more doable for you than others, depending on the kind of musician you are, how far along you are in your career, and what your big-picture goals are. 

Start by exploring just a couple of avenues that excite you the most right now, and double down on whatever seems to be working best for you in the upcoming weeks.

Spotify now enables fans to pay artists money direct, via Cash App and PayPal.me partnerships 

Spotify now enables fans to pay artists money direct, via Cash App and PayPal.me partnershipsSpotify just announced some big news for artists – and their bank accounts. 

The streaming platform has long enabled artists to highlight a piece of music on their profile via the ‘Artist’s Pick’ headline. 

Now, Spotify has launched a sister version of this feature, ‘Artist Fundraising Pick’, which allows acts to pin a specific destination on their profile where fan can pay them ‘tips’.

Guest post by: Tim Ingham of MBW

Artists wishing to use their Fundraising Pick to encourage their fans to pay money to good causes are welcome to do so – either via GoFundMe, or direct to a range of causes supported by Spotify’s COVID-19 Music Relief project. 

However, artists wishing to use Fundraising Pick to encourage their fans to pay themmoney, can also do so – via a link to one of two endorsed e-wallet services, PayPal.me and Cash App. 

The timing of the launch of ‘Artist Fundraising Pick’ is obviously apt, amid a global pandemic that has wiped away any hope of live touring income for artists, while also hurting physical music sales and licensing revenues.

Said Spotify in a blog today: “Given the urgency and impact of the COVID-19 crisis, we’re working as quickly as we can to develop this new product and get it out to as many artists as possible. However, we’ve never built a fundraising feature like this before. We consider this a first version that will evolve as we learn how to make it as helpful as possible for the music community.” 

Time will tell how committed Spotify is to the long-term idea of fans being able to ‘tip’ artists money directly on its platform, or whether these features will be retired after (fingers crossed, everyone!) the COVID-19 pandemic dissipates. 

Online fan ‘tipping’ has become commonplace on platforms such as Twitch (via the platform’s ‘Cheering’ feature), and has also become a key tenet of Tencent Music Entertainment’s business in China

“GIVEN THE URGENCY AND IMPACT OF THE COVID-19 CRISIS, WE’RE WORKING AS QUICKLY AS WE CAN TO DEVELOP THIS NEW PRODUCT AND GET IT OUT TO AS MANY ARTISTS AS POSSIBLE.” 

- SPOTIFY 

YouTube launched a ‘Fan funding’ virtual tip jar feature for creators in 2014, but later retired it. In 2017, YouTube essentially replaced this tip jar with ‘Super Chat’, which enables fans to pay to have their live chat messages highlighted; creators  earn a share of this money. 

One of Spotify’s new partners, Cash App, has pledged a $1m fund for artists in the US and UK on the service as part of today’s announcement, which has the double benefit of helping acts during a difficult time… while also monetarily incentivising them to use Cash App rather than PayPal.me. 

How that fund works: Spotify for Artists users that submit their “$cashtag” username as their Artist Fundraising Pick — and secure at least one monetary contribution through Spotify — will receive an extra $100 in their account from Cash App, until a collective total of $1 million has been contributed. 

According to Spotify, artists from all over the world and at various stages of their careers have helped launch the Artist Fundraising Pick. 

Tyrese Pope is fundraising through Cash App. 

He said: “I’ve been using Cash App to raise money for a while but now that listeners can contribute through Spotify, it’s going to make a big difference. With touring now impossible, it’s never been harder for artists to make ends meet, so the extra contributions from Cash App and listeners alike will really help when we need it most.” 

Boy Scouts (aka Taylor Vick) is also fundraising through Cash App. 

She commented: “Like so many others right now, I am out of work as our tours have been cancelled or postponed because of COVID-19. Any help is appreciated as we keep in our efforts to find new ways to get by.” 

“I’VE BEEN USING CASH APP TO RAISE MONEY FOR A WHILE BUT NOW THAT LISTENERS CAN CONTRIBUTE THROUGH SPOTIFY, IT’S GOING TO MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE.” 

- TYRESE POPE 

Benjamin Ingrosso is fundraising for Musikerforbundet. 

“I want to be helpful in the ways I can during these difficult times,” said Ingrosso. “I’ve seen lots of my fellow musicians lose work due to the current situation. Most of us don’t know when we will be able to go back to work. 

“Music is something that always helps us in rough times like these as well as being there with us to celebrate all the happy moments. I’m hoping that this fundraising for Musikerförbundet can help us get through this and get us back up on the stage, when all of this is over, to bring happiness to people with live music again.” 

Marshmello is fundraising for MusiCares: “So many of us have been affected by the COVID-19 virus, and now more than ever we need to stand together and help each other. 

“MusiCares is helping all working musicians, producers, songwriters, engineers and so many. Let’s all do our part to help those who need it most!” 

Spotify said: “This is an incredibly difficult time for many Spotify users and people around the world — and there are many worthy causes to support at this time. 

“With this feature, we simply hope to enable those who have the interest and means to support artists in this time of great need, and to create another opportunity for our COVID-19 Music Relief partners to find the financial support they need to continue working in music and lift our industry.”Music Business Worldwide

Bandzoogle Now Offers Live Stream Ticket Sale Feature on All Plans 

Bandzoogle Now Offers Live Stream Ticket Sale Feature on All Plans

 

I am both a fan and client of Bandzoogle, the website builder created by musicians for musicians. I've been using their platform to build my websites for a number of years. I've also recommended Banzoogle to DIY students and clients involved in a variety of creative industries. And no, I am not being compensated to promote their services. I'm simply a believer.

Today, Bandzoogle announced that in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the company has updated its ticketing options so that Bandzzoglers can now sell tickets commission-free to live streaming events - directly through their websites. While normally a Pro plan feature, ticket sales will be available on all plans, to all Bandzoogle members during the pandemic.

This feature is a fantastic resource for all of us performing creatives looking to find ways to continue generating revenue while sheltering in place. In fact, I would go so far as to say that being able to generate revenue from digital performances is going to be a significant part of performing artist's futures. 

Many artists are currently relying on Facebook Live and other social media platforms to host and promote their streaming shows. While convenient, relying on platforms one does not own or control is also problematic. There are licensing issues (that won't always be overlooked as they are now), algorithm issues that create audience access unpredictability, TOS, and other uncontrollable components in the social media space. 

Being able to host live streaming events from one's website provides some solutions to the aforementioned problems. It also helps to generate web traffic, build an artist's permission-based database, nurture community, and engagement, all of which can lead to present and future monetization from numerous income verticals. 

There are other live streaming options available, Stageit and Bandsintown being two reputable sources worth looking into. But one of the things I appreciate about Bandzoogle is, as with all of its e-commerce features, selling tickets through your own website is 100% commission-free, forever. That means all revenue goes directly to you. 

Hit me up with any questions or comments. I'm happy to be a resource.

Financial Help For Colorado's Creative Industries Community 

Financial Help For Colorado's Creative Industries Community

Colorado Arts & Culture Community. COVID-19’s impact on Colorado has been widespread. 

The $2 trillion CARE Act is a major economic resource to help Colorado’s small businesses experiencing economic harm. A key portion of this act is the Paycheck Protection Program which allocates $349 billion in forgivable loans to help small businesses, independent contractors and nonprofits meet payroll and rent needs. 

The first step in accessing these forgivable loans is to prepare the materials necessary to apply. That includes confirming your eligibility, gathering the necessary records (payroll, rent, utilities, tax and bank records) and estimating the eligible amount of your forgivable loan. 

For additional details on the Paycheck Protection Program’s forgivable loans and a comprehensive list of state and federal resources available for Colorado’s businesses, visit choosecolorado.com/covid19. OEDIT representatives are available to answer your questions through the COVID Economic Hotline at (303) 860-5881.

50 Income Streams Music Creatives Should Know About - And Where to Find Them 

50 Income Streams Music Creatives Should Know About...And Where To Find Them 

Music royalties, licensing fees and the numerous other streams of revenue available to songwriters, performers and producers can be difficult to navigate. The good news is, the rapid growth of technology has produced more opportunities for distribution, new forms of music royalties and more ways than ever to track and collect monies due to you. The challenge is in knowing what types of royalties and fees are out there. 

In the world of music royalties, it all starts with the song. Each song is protected by copyrights in two categories: 

A copyright for the songwriting, or “composition”, categorized as the Composition 

A copyright for the performance, categorized as the Sound Recording. 

Depending on your role in the writing, production or recording of any given song, you may earn royalties in one copyright category or both. 

Beyond copyright royalties, there are a wide range of fees and profit centers that can encompass the earnings of a music professional. It is critical for creatives to be familiar with these revenue sources and have expert help whenever possible to track and collect the royalties, fees and income to which you are entitled. There is much to know, but there is also a wealth of information online, whether through sources like Wikipedia, official websites for Performing Rights Organizations (PROs) like ASCAP, BMI and SESAC, or right here, in this royalty income guide that Sound Royalties has put together for you. 

In the new digital music economy the creator is king. As an artist-friendly company, Sound Royalties is dedicated to the empowerment of creative talent. To help you flourish and sustain your career, here is our guide to royalty and revenue streams all music creatives should know about. 

Click here for a fantastic Income Stream resource from Sound Royalties!

Show Business is a Lot More Business Than Show - I Can Help 

Show Business is a Lot More Business Than Show - I Can Help

For most of us, making a full-time living making music is the goal. But in order to achieve this, it is essential to identify whether or not you're on the right track. 

As an exercise, think for a moment about why you're not currently making a full-time living making music... 

  • Do you know how to make a full-time living making music? 
  • Do you have a strategy for getting started and building a sustainable music career? 
  • Do you understand the different income streams available to you? 
  • Do you have a strategy for growing and nurturing a community of fans and followers? 
  • Do you have a strategy for monetizing your community? 
  • Are you marketing effectively? 
  • Do you have clarity about to whom you should be marketing and how? 

I would love to talk with you, hear your story, and help you move your career forward. If this sounds interesting to you, contact me today and let's create a plan to help you make a living making music.

Contact me today for a free no-obligation consultation.

Michael Pickering, M.A., Music Business, ACUE 

BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Michael Pickering, President and Chief Creative Officer of Lionsong Entertainment, Inc., and former Director and founder of the Music and Entertainment Entrepreneurship program at the Community College of Aurora, is a creative leader, entrepreneur, educator, and musician. He holds a Master of Arts in Music Business Degree and a B.P.S. in Interdisciplinary Music Studies Degree from the Berklee College of Music. He has served on the boards of local arts and entertainment organizations, authored post-secondary music curricula, and spoken at many local and national music industry events. He also provides music and entertainment business and performance consulting services (www.mpickeringmusic.com). Michael and his wife, Amy Pickering, remain active as national headline music and clean comedy performing artists for corporate, theatrical, educational, outreach, cruise, and private clients worldwide — www.michaelandamy.com.

Funding For Musicians: U.S. Music Grants 

Funding For Musicians: U.S. Music Grants

It’s easier than ever to make music and share it with the world. But being able to do it full-time is another story. 

There are lots of different ways musicians can make money, but one source of funding for music projects often overlooked is grants. 

Guest post by Dave Cool 

What are music grants? 

Grants are an excellent form of funding for musicians. There are dozens of music grant organizations in the USA that regularly award cash to serious artists, allowing the recipients to focus entirely on furthering their music career in some way. And unlike loans, they don’t need to be paid back. 

Sound too good to be true? These funding opportunities are out there for the taking, but they’re very competitive. You’ll need to research which ones are a good fit for you, find out when the deadlines are, and set aside plenty of time for the application process, which can be intense. 

Some music grant organizations exist to help out fledgling artists, while others support more established artists. Depending on the type of grant, the funding could be used to get a new music project off the ground, record an album, or tour. Some organizations place no restrictions at all on how you can use the money. 

Here are seven of our favorite music grants available in the United States to get your wheels turning. But definitely check out local opportunities in your own city or state, you never know what you might come across. 

1. New Music USA grants 

Region: United States 

New Music USA’s mission is to support and promote all kinds of musical creativity in the United States. They offer funding for music projects, support for small ensembles and DIY venues, and even provide composer-in-residence positions in orchestras. Learn more about New Music USA’s grants. 

2. Foundation for Contemporary Arts 

Region: United States 

The Foundation for Contemporary Arts was created by artists in 1963 to promote the innovative work of their peers. Today, they offer generous grants to nominated artists, as well as emergency grants ranging from $500 to $2,500 that any artist urgently in need of funding can apply for. Learn more about the Foundation for Contemporary Arts’ grant programs. 

3. The Alice M. Ditson Fund 

Region: United States 

Since 1940, the Alice M. Ditson Fund has awarded over 2,000 grants in support of contemporary American classical concert music. They offer funding for recording projects, with the specific goal of providing wider exposure for the music of younger, relatively unknown American composers. Learn more. 

4. New York Foundation for the Arts 

Region: New York 

The New York Foundation for the Arts has a 32-year history of supporting artists at all stages of their careers. Unlike grants that fund specific projects, the unrestricted $7,000 fellowships “are intended to fund an artist’s vision or voice, regardless of the level of his or her artistic development.” You can find up-to-date application information here. 

5. Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation 

Region: Delaware, D.C., Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, the US Virgin Islands, Virginia, and West Virginia 

The Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation was established to support multi-state arts programming and has since expanded to include initiatives in other parts of the United States. The grants provide support for artists looking to create, tour, build an audience, and develop their careers. 

You can explore MAAF’s unique artist grant programs here, which include creative fellowships, funding to perform at international festivals, and even a French-American cultural exchange program for jazz artists. 

6. Tennessee Arts Commission 

Region: Tennessee 

With a mission to “cultivate the arts for the benefit of all Tennesseans and their communities,” the Tennessee Arts Commission offers a wide variety of annual grants for individuals, projects, arts education, and more. 

The Individual Artist Fellowship awards $5,000 to professional artists of all stripes, including composers. There are no specific requirements for how you use the money, but you do have to already be making a living off of music to qualify for the fellowship. More details here. 

7. COLA Individual Artist Fellowship 

Region: Los Angeles, CA 

This fellowship is specifically for accomplished artists who either live in Los Angeles or have presented their work in the city for at least three years. The Department of Cultural Affairs grants $10,000 per artist for the creation of innovative new work. Check out the eligibility details and application guidelines here

Even if you don’t get the music grant you wanted the first time around, applying for funding is still a valuable process to go through. As you continue honing your craft and refining your unique artist voice, your applications will become stronger and stronger.